C-130 Hercules

C-130 Hercules

The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop military transport aircraft designed and built originally by Lockheed, now Lockheed Martin. Capable of using unprepared runways for takeoffs and landings, the C-130 was originally designed as a troop, medical evacuation, and cargo transport aircraft. The versatile airframe has found uses in a variety of other roles, including as a gunship (AC-130), for airborne assault, search and rescue, scientific research support, weather reconnaissance, aerial refueling, maritime patrol and aerial firefighting. It is the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. Over 40 models and variants of the Hercules serve with more than 60 nations.

Wikipedia

A C-130 Hercules with the 107th Airlift Wing fires off flares during a night formation training mission. Flares are used to deter infrared homing (heat seeking) surface-to-air or air-to-air missile. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. Ray Lloyd)

A C-130 Hercules with the 107th Airlift Wing fires off flares during a night formation training mission. Flares are used to deter infrared homing (heat seeking) surface-to-air or air-to-air missile. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. Ray Lloyd)

(Source: outlookseries.com)

soldierporn:

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: The future was wide open.
Air Force Airman 1st Class Ryan Suggs, loadmaster with the 52nd Expeditionary Airlift Squadron, observes the cloud cover in preparation for pararescuemen from the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron to free-fall jump from a U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules over Djibouti. Training jumps cannot take place with complete cloud cover.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Staci Miller, 12 MAR 2014. And they all lived happily ever after.)

soldierporn:

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: The future was wide open.

Air Force Airman 1st Class Ryan Suggs, loadmaster with the 52nd Expeditionary Airlift Squadron, observes the cloud cover in preparation for pararescuemen from the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron to free-fall jump from a U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules over Djibouti. Training jumps cannot take place with complete cloud cover.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Staci Miller, 12 MAR 2014. And they all lived happily ever after.)